It’s official! We’ve reached the one-year mark. One year ago, my husband, our three young kids, and I – along with 13 suitcases of everything we owned – boarded a plane and moved to South Asia, where we’ve lived, worked, and learned for 12 months now. As I reflect upon taking this giant leap of faith this time last year, I find myself stuck in a world of ...

Hope is transforming communities around the world! 15,000+ marginalized people are receiving healthcare, clean water, better farming techniques, quality education, & life skills through IDEAS projects. Thank you from those whose hope is being restored worldwide through these projects. . .

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Wearily, his mom leaves the family’s one-room home at the bottom of the apartment building to walk to the store. Her preteen son quietly sneaks out the door and peeks around the building corner to make sure that his mother is not turning back for something she forgot. He already knows that his father is away.

Gratitude is appreciated in any language and culture. Gratitude benefits everyone - the giver and the receiver. Studies show that those who regularly practice gratitude have dozens of mental and physical benefits, including. . .

If you have ever read " Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day" by Judith Viorst, you can sympathize with Alexander’s woes of waking up with gum in his hair, not being able to please his teachers, discovering a cavity at the dentist’s office, and losing his best friend to someone else. 

When thinking about moving overseas, we usually give a lot of thought about how to pack and what to take with us. But, it’s also good to think about what to leave behind. Here are a few tips from those who have moved overseas.

The Karen people have experienced oppression for over sixty years with little to no access to healthcare and services. Due to this lack of access to healthcare, 721 women die per 100,000 live births.

As soon as the doors open at the refugee center, people start streaming in, a barrage of needs and desperate requests: “I can’t get food coupons.” “Can I take English classes?” “I need clothing.” “The hospital won’t help me.” “I don’t have a place to live.” Each request is a reminder of the sheer numbers of refugees and the limited resources ...

Lebanon is a small country, and I used to live on the outskirts of Beirut, which is overpopulated. People were friendly and curious about others, especially when their new neighbor was the only Asian-American in that area. 

My very first language class was held downtown between the hours of 8:00pm and 10:00pm.  My supervisor was less than thrilled. I was on my own, new to the country, and finding my way around the city.