After 75 hours of travel with COVID restrictions, 3 kids under the age of 5, and 8 bags, we landed in the U.S. for the first time in 3 years feeling stunned, excited, exhausted, and overwhelmed.

As a librarian, I love to see the excitement when readers discover books with characters who are like them. Third-culture kids (TCKs) have a unique identity, not tied to any one place, growing up in one or more countries that are not their passport country.

Meet XiaoQin and XiaoHu! These two young adults share their stories of transformation through an IDEAS project that meets long-term holistic needs of rural communities in China by providing clean water, hygiene training, improved agricultural techniques, and a sponsorship program that allows children to graduate school, find good jobs, and give back to ...

It turns out that living overseas is the best preparation for a world-wide pandemic a person could ask for (or not ask for).

When you live and travel on a regular basis, it’s easy for your children to learn about the world. But even if you can’t travel, which is limited for everyone during COVID, you can still teach your children to have a mindset that values different people and cultures. 

We all wrestle with different anxieties, whether fear of spiders, heights, germs, confined spaces, or the dark. Yet, something that tends to impact all of us is fear of the unknown.

Read around the world this summer to some of the countries where IDEAS works! Enjoy this summer reading list for teens and tweens created by IDEAS Associate and global librarian, Libby. Stayed tuned next week for a summer reading list for adults!

My family and I recently returned from a long trip: 47 days, 9 hotels/homes, 5 flights, 2 small children, and many unexpected changes of plans. We lived to tell the tale and be thankful for it! We’ve lived overseas for almost five years and are not strangers to travel, but we’ve realized the way we travel had to change once we became parents.

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Today it hit me, wells of emotions came rushing from nowhere and shook me from the inside out. My son is going away from his family core to begin his own life away from us, away from what we call home at this moment in time.

When my wife and I moved to Asia with our two boys many years ago, we knew that the only communication we would have with our family would be through letters. There would be the occasional phone call, but phone calls were expensive and the sound quality was poor. Our parents would experience their grandchildren growing up only though photographs and ...