Culture affects everything. I know this, but even after living in three countries besides my passport country, I am caught by surprise at what culture impacts. For example, recently I was reminded that the concept of corners is cultural.

I have just recently started to feel like I’m catching a glimpse of the “other side” of my loneliness after six long months here in my native-born country. My heart has been aching with loneliness: "New Situation," "I'm Different," "No Friends."

It’s like a switch deep inside me. I can turn it on, but it’s more common for me to turn it off.  

Often we do not realize that much of our identity is based on our cultural foundation. Most of us are confident that we know how to operate in our daily lives—in familiar settings. We know our professional culture: how to complete our daily work, how relationships ought to be carried out, how to make small talk around the “water cooler.” We are familiar with ...

When my daughter lived in Hawaii, she worked with a non-profit that had a friendship and feeding ministry with homeless and low-income people.  Their ministry included interacting with the people they served, which was described as talk story.

We first arrived in Morocco with two little boys, ages three and five, in tow. Imagine the scene — piles of suitcases, hungry children, sleep-deprived parents.

Greetings from the beautiful farmland of North Africa!

When I first moved overseas fifteen years ago, I was told over and over, “You are going into a new culture.  Be a learner.  You don’t know this culture.  Be a learner.”  Over and over…