Last night I received a text from one of my English students. “Sorry to bother you, teacher. What does ‘capeesh’ mean? It’s not in the dictionary.”  

I am an optometrist living and serving in the Middle East. I examine refugee patients at two humble clinics situated within two local churches. I primarily see Syrian and Iraqi refugees.

Sai Sai Poe is a Physician Assistant student at Earth Mission Asia and in his last year of training at the Rain Tree Clinic, which was established on the edge of Karen state in Myanmar to provide healthcare for the Karen people and training for local students in the ...

Delicately my friend sets a well-used plastic shopping bag in front of us on the floor. We’ve been sitting for a while on a piece of folded old carpet and drinking strong tea out of miniature glasses. The plastic bag is stuffed with old photographs. 

Hope is transforming communities around the world! 15,000+ marginalized people are receiving healthcare, clean water, better farming techniques, quality education, & life skills through IDEAS projects. Thank you from those whose hope is being restored worldwide through these projects. . .

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Wearily, his mom leaves the family’s one-room home at the bottom of the apartment building to walk to the store. Her preteen son quietly sneaks out the door and peeks around the building corner to make sure that his mother is not turning back for something she forgot. He already knows that his father is away.

If you have ever read " Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day" by Judith Viorst, you can sympathize with Alexander’s woes of waking up with gum in his hair, not being able to please his teachers, discovering a cavity at the dentist’s office, and losing his best friend to someone else. 

When thinking about moving overseas, we usually give a lot of thought about how to pack and what to take with us. But, it’s also good to think about what to leave behind. Here are a few tips from those who have moved overseas.

The Karen people have experienced oppression for over sixty years with little to no access to healthcare and services. Due to this lack of access to healthcare, 721 women die per 100,000 live births.

As soon as the doors open at the refugee center, people start streaming in, a barrage of needs and desperate requests: “I can’t get food coupons.” “Can I take English classes?” “I need clothing.” “The hospital won’t help me.” “I don’t have a place to live.” Each request is a reminder of the sheer numbers of refugees and the limited resources ...