I’m in a season of waiting, and my guess is that you are too. Waiting is what we all have in common worldwide. We’re all waiting for something or someone, for grief to subside, a sense of normal, returning to school or work, a new job opportunity, a baby, a child to come home, a spouse, the freedom to visit loved ones, healing for our physical and emotional ...

Before coming to Thailand to become an instructor for Karen students training to become physician assistants, I had heard about how wonderful the Karen people are. Now that I have been in Thailand for a year, I can attest to this and how one student in particular has impacted me.

At 4:00am I hear my phone vibrate. A message appears: “Hi, my teacher. Are you ok? Can I get food?” 

Last night I received a text from one of my English students. “Sorry to bother you, teacher. What does ‘capeesh’ mean? It’s not in the dictionary.”  

I am an optometrist living and serving in the Middle East. I examine refugee patients at two humble clinics situated within two local churches. I primarily see Syrian and Iraqi refugees.

Sai Sai Poe is a Physician Assistant student at Earth Mission Asia and in his last year of training at the Rain Tree Clinic, which was established on the edge of Karen state in Myanmar to provide healthcare for the Karen people and training for local students in the ...

Hope is transforming communities around the world! 15,000+ marginalized people are receiving healthcare, clean water, better farming techniques, quality education, & life skills through IDEAS projects. Thank you from those whose hope is being restored worldwide through these projects. . .

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The Karen people have experienced oppression for over sixty years with little to no access to healthcare and services. Due to this lack of access to healthcare, 721 women die per 100,000 live births.

As soon as the doors open at the refugee center, people start streaming in, a barrage of needs and desperate requests: “I can’t get food coupons.” “Can I take English classes?” “I need clothing.” “The hospital won’t help me.” “I don’t have a place to live.” Each request is a reminder of the sheer numbers of refugees and the limited resources ...

Lebanon is a small country, and I used to live on the outskirts of Beirut, which is overpopulated. People were friendly and curious about others, especially when their new neighbor was the only Asian-American in that area.